Test planning and reporting performance testing for stationary source emissions

The Performance Test Program maintains test plan examples to assist companies and test consultants in meeting the requirements of Minnesota rules when designing a test plan. These sample performance test plans are designed to meet the minimum requirements of Minn. R. 7017.2030. Note that your test plan is subject to the review and written approval of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The written approval may contain clarifications or modifications to the test plan as submitted. Example Test Plan formats are available for the categories listed below:

  • Miscellaneous
  • Boilers
  • Asphalt Plants
  • Crushing and Conveying
  • Solvent Based Printing
  • Materials Conveying
  • Waste Combustors - Class IV
  • Waste Combustors - Class A, II, III, C, and D

Test Plan Examples

Note: All text in italics are suggestions and comments for the test plan writer. Its purpose is to assist in drafting a complete test plan.

Test Plan Completeness Criteria

Complete and accurate test plans are required by the MPCA to ensure that your test plan is reviewed in a timely manner. Incomplete test plans can cause delays in scheduled performance testing and could potentially effect the quality and completeness of your submitted test report.  

Use the Microsoft Office document icon Test Plan Completeness Criteria form as a check list to ensure your test plan includes all required information.

Pretest Meeting

A pretest meeting gives the facility, the testing company and MPCA staff the opportunity to discuss the test plan and testing activities in order to help ensure all procedural and technical requirements of the rule are met. These meetings also assist MPCA staff in understanding the processes at the facility. Meetings can often be held over the telephone or via e-mail exchange, if a complete and accurate test plan has been submitted.

Complete test report

Complete and accurate test reports are required by the MPCA to ensure that your test report is reviewed in a timely manner. Incomplete test reports can cause delays and can potentially be rejected if adequate information to determine compliance with emissions standards or other applicable requirements is not included.

The Performance Test Report Completeness Criteria form is a checklist that you may use to ensure that your test report includes all required information.

This information can also be found in Minn. R. 7017.2035 subp. 3. This and other forms are available on the Performance Testing Forms page.

Guidance

Minnesota Performance Test and Monitoring Rules

Types of Engineering Tests

  • True Engineering Tests — Are conducted voluntarily by an emission facility with no intention to use the results as a data submittal. The test need not conform to the notification, procedural, and submittal requirements of the performance test rule, as long as the emission facility is operated within the parameters allowed under its current permit and any applicable rules or compliance documents. If a true engineering test indicates noncompliance with an emission or other limit, the Company must inform the MPCA. The MPCA may request test results, if necessary.
  • Data Submittal Engineering Tests — Are conducted voluntarily by the emission facility for the purpose of submitting the results to the MPCA. Data Submittal Engineering Tests are typically used to support a permit application or an emission inventory. The performance test rules notification, procedural, and submittal requirements must be followed.
  • Compliance Engineering Test  Are conducted voluntarily by an emission facility for the purpose of submitting the results to the MPCA to change an existing operating limit or to demonstrate compliance at an alternate operating scenario. The performance test rules notification, procedural, and submittal requirements must be followed.

Noncompliance Reporting

Please be aware that all periods of noncompliance with emission or other limits must be reported to the MPCA. Engineering tests are not exempt from this reporting requirement. Operating at a rate other than that allowed by the current air permit must also be reported. Deviations must be reported on the facility’s semiannual deviation (DRF-2) and annual compliance certification (CR-04) reporting forms.