Operational resources

Household Hazardous Waste programs collect, manage, and properly dispose of household generated hazardous wastes. These programs include permanent facilities, collection or mobile events, and curbside collections. Some programs are also licensed to accept hazardous waste from certain businesses.

mapsearchHazardous waste identification number

Find and verify a business's hazardous waste generation status.

Standard operating procedures

Standard operating procedures ensure household hazardous waste (HHW) programs are operating in compliance with DOT, OSHA and MN laws and regulations. HHW federal, state, and contractual requirements are established in the State of Minnesota Joint Powers Agreement of a HHW Program contract, DOT Code of Federal Regulations CFR 49, Parts 171-180, OSHA CFR 29 Part 1910 and MN Rules Chapter 7045 (7045.0310 for HHW).

These templates can be modified to meet your site-specific need. For questions or assistance, contact Teresa Gilbertson, 507-476-4254.

To locate a specific SOP topic, please refer to this index:

PDF icon Alphabetical index to standard operating procedures (w-hhwsop0-00)

Gear illustrationHousehold hazardous waste programs may accept waste from certain businesses. Before a facility can accept VSQG waste, the program or facility must obtain a VSQG consolidation license from the MPCA. Contact Teresa Gilbertson, 507-476-4254 for information.

A participating Household Hazardous Waste program can accept waste from the following:

  • Minimum Quantity Generator (MQG) - Ten gallons or 100 pounds per year.
  • One-time Generator (OTG) - a one-time only disposal of up to 2,200 pounds. Is typically abandoned materials or from a one-time clean-out event. It cannot include waste from business's normal operation.
  • Very Small Quantity Generator (VSQG) - generates up to 220 pounds (or about 22 gallons of liquid) per month.

Resources

Microsoft Office document icon Minimal Quantity Business Generated Waste

An overview of requirements for HHW programs that want to collect from small quantity generators.

File VSQG and One-time Generator Waste Acceptance

Overview of requirements to accept business hazardous waste from Very Small Quantity Generators and One-time Generators.

File How to help a business obtain a HW ID Number

Steps to help a business obtain a hazardous waste ID number.

PDF icon VSQG collection program requirements for generators (w-hw2-51)

PDF icon Transportation guidelines for VSQG collection programs (w-hw2-54b)

A resource for employees transporting hazardous materials, including labeling and packaging requirements.

PDF icon Transport of hazardous waste from VSQGs by government-operated VSQG collection programs (w-hw8-07)

barrelWhen managing household hazardous materials, safely combining and storing the various chemicals is necessary to prevent the release of chemicals that could threaten human health or the environment.

Microsoft Office document icon Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

An overview of RCRA regulations. RCRA governs hazardous waste while at a household hazardous waste facility. The seven counties in the metro area are RCRA approved to inspect and issue licenses. All other Minnesota counties are regulated by the MPCA.

Microsoft Office document icon Packaging hazardous waste

Requirements for facilities on packaging hazardous waste in preparation for transport and disposal. The three methods of packaging include bulking, lab packing, and loose packing.

Microsoft Office document icon Bulking hazardous waste

Guidance on proper bulking methods. A method that consolidates several containers of similar material into a single container, usually a 55-gallon drum. Waste materials such as flammable liquids, paint, used oil, and waste antifreeze are typically bulked.

Microsoft Office document icon Waste Storage

Procedures and requirements for storing hazardous waste.

Household hazardous waste programs ensure its facility operations, whether permanent or temporary, protect human and environmental health by maintaining their equipment and process waste safely.

Microsoft Office document icon Emergency Contingency Plan

An emergency contingency plan is necessary in case of a fire, explosion, or unplanned chemical release. The SOP includes an example of an emergency responder form, emergency contingency plan, and evacuation map.

Microsoft Office document icon Spill Response - HHW facilities

Processing waste

Microsoft Office document icon Receiving waste

Procedures for properly receiving household hazardous waste including what materials are acceptable. Defines what qualifies as business waste from multi-housing units, farms, home-based businesses, or public sites.

Microsoft Office document icon Sorting wastes

Procedures for sorting incoming waste includes determining the waste hazard classification, ensuring incompatible materials are safely segregated, and provide guidance for transportation of the waste.

Microsoft Office document icon Packaging hazardous waste

Requirements for facilities on packaging hazardous waste in preparation for transport and disposal. The three methods of packaging include bulking, lab packing, and loose packing.

Microsoft Office document icon Bulking hazardous waste

Guidance on proper bulking methods. A method that consolidates several containers of similar material into a single container, usually a 55-gallon drum. Waste materials such as flammable liquids, paint, used oil, and waste antifreeze are typically bulked.

Microsoft Office document icon Preparing waste for shipment

Requirements, tasks, and preparations to ensure hazardous materials are safe and ready for transport.

PDF icon Managing products for reuse (w-hhwsop4-15)

A product exchange or reuse area is a place for citizens to pickup free usable products. Requirements for screening and safety operations ensure employees and visitors are safe. Includes a liability release/receipt template. (June 2017)

Microsoft Office document icon Non-commercial declaration

Microsoft Office document icon Treating hazardous wastes

Requirements and procedures for treating or processing hazardous materials. Includes the application form for on-site treatment.

Mobile events

Microsoft Office document icon Mobile collection events

Provides guidance for safe and efficient acceptance of hazardous materials at an off-site mobile event. Covers areas of safety, traffic management, volunteers, and event preparations. Includes the following forms: Emergency responder notification form; Emergency Contacts; List of equipment needed; Agreement and certificate of attendance; Collection event survey.

Equipment and maintenance

icon tools

Microsoft Office document icon Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklifts)

Includes training resources, checklists, and procedures for staff operating powered industrial trucks, which include fork, platform, motorized hand trucks, or other specialized units.

Microsoft Office document icon Equipment operation and maintenance

Programs are responsible for establishing procedures for equipment use and maintenance.

Microsoft Office document icon Floor coating

Impermeable flooring is required at a facility or mobile collection event.

Microsoft Office document icon Ventilation and air monitoring devices

Continuous air quality monitoring and ventilation equipment are important for safety. Covers air quality sampling and equipment maintenance.

Microsoft Office document icon Lockout/Tagout

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) refers to a set of requirements in case of an unexpected energization or startup of equipment, or the release of hazardous energy during service or maintenance activities. This SOP includes:

  • Implementing a LOTO program
  • Annual inspection form
  • Compliance checklist

icon safetyManaging hazardous waste poses a risk to employees. Household hazardous waste programs are responsible to ensure they are operating in compliance with worker laws and regulations.

File Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Covers OSHA requirements, common violations, and resources. (Last update June 2017)

Microsoft Office document icon Workplace Accident and Injury Reduction Program (AWAIR)

Facilities are responsible for developing and implementing a formal health and safety program. The SOP includes a weekly safety inspection checklist and  incident report template are included.

Microsoft Office document icon Right-to-Know Program

Right-to-Know (RTK) pertains to chemicals used (not collected) within a facility. Includes guidance on how to implement a RTK program, information notice, hazards list, and information on CO2, corrosives, gases, heat stress, particulates, and solvents.

Microsoft Office document icon Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Personal protective equipment is used to protect staff form exposure or injuries.  Covers requirements for PPE.

Microsoft Office document icon Respirator Program

Covers requirements for use and maintenance of respiratory protective equipment.

Microsoft Office document icon Bloodborne pathogen control

An exposure control plan will help to eliminate or minimize exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials.

Microsoft Office document icon Ergonomics

Addresses health and safety requirements related to potential ergonomic-related hazards.

Microsoft Office document icon Hearing conservation

Addresses noise monitoring and testing, and use of hearing protection. Includes a compliance checklist and hearing protection notice.

Microsoft Office document icon Medical monitoring

Covers OSHA requirements and protocols. Includes release forms and scenarios to help determine medical monitoring needs.

Other resources

Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry workplace posters

HTML icon A Workplace Accident and Injury Reduction program (Minnesota OSHA)

Air monitoring study

In 2006, the MPCA took air samples at HHW facilities to evaluate exposure of solvents to workers. This project was a follow-up to another study done in 1996 by the University of Minnesota’s Industrial Hygiene Department. Both studies evaluated exposure of solvents to workers while bulking wastes to determine if personal protective measures were adequate. Both studies found that inhaling organic vapors do not pose a risk if proper procedures are followed. Contact Teresa Gilbertson for a copy of the 2006 air monitoring summary.
 

Report illustration

Microsoft Office document icon OSHA recordkeeping and posters

Facilities must provide a safe work environment and have clear instructions on how to report an injury or illness. Covers OSHA's poster and recordkeeping requirements.

Microsoft Office document icon Emergency Contingency Plan

An emergency contingency plan is necessary in case of a fire, explosion, or unplanned chemical release. The SOP includes an example of an emergency responder form, emergency contingency plan, and evacuation map.

Microsoft Office document icon Notification of program changes

Certain changes to a HHW facility must be reported to the state.

File Greater than 90 day facility standards

Facilities must get approval to accept waste from from another HHW facility or to store HHW for more than 90 days. Includes the application to accept or store HHW waste.

File Participant tracking and reporting - Greater Minnesota

Facilities are responsible to track and report participation data. Includes a participation certification form.

Microsoft Office document icon Manifest signature authority

Facility staff must be certified to sign manifests. The SOP covers requirements and includes sample exams.

File Manifests and Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs)

A manifest is a multi-copy shipping document (EPA Form 8700-22) that tracks hazardous waste from generation to disposal. LDRs indicate whether waste does or does not meet land disposal standards and must accompany each manifest.

Microsoft Office document icon Shipping papers or waste tracking invoices

In some circumstances, shipping papers or waste tracking invoices may be used in lieu of a manifest form. Addresses tracking requirements and includes an example shipping paper.

PDF icon Transportation guidelines for VSQG collection programs (w-hw2-54b)

A resource for employees transporting hazardous materials, including labeling and packaging requirements.

Other resources

HTML icon Mandatory workplace posters

Minnesota law requires employers to display some state-mandated posters in a physical location where employees can easily see them. (Minn. Dept. of Labor and Industry)

Molecule illustration

Microsoft Office document icon Abandoned or unknown wastes

Abandoned waste is described as any unwanted hazardous material that is abandoned on property without the owner’s permission. Unknown wastes include any material whose chemical makeup or characteristic is unidentifiable.  Covers screening and identifying procedures and includes a report form.

Microsoft Office document icon Ag-generated pesticides

Overview of facilities that partner with MDA to accept pesticides from farms or licensed applicators. Pesticides are classified as universal wastes.

Microsoft Office document icon Asbestos

Guidance for evaluating and accepting asbestos. A list of common asbestos materials that display hazardous characteristics is included.

Microsoft Office document icon Ballasts or PCB wastes

Microsoft Office document icon Explosive and reactive waste

If a situation arises, facilities must immediately implement a chain of command protocol for managing explosive or reactive waste. Includes an unstable and reactive chemical list.

Microsoft Office document icon Methamphetamine lab waste

Criteria for accepting and managing waste from a methamphetamine laboratory. It is illegal to accept finished controlled substances. DEA regulations apply if controlled substances are discovered.

Microsoft Office document icon Mercury - evaluating, managing, and spill response

Guidelines for evaluating and managing mercury at a facility along with spill response and cleanup guidelines.

Microsoft Office document icon Pharmaceutical waste

Requirements for accepting pharmaceuticals at a facility or at a law enforcement collection event.

Microsoft Office document icon Radioactive waste

Protocol for managing radioactive waste. Includes a list of common radioactive materials and labels.

Microsoft Office document icon Universal waste

Procedures for widely generated wastes with reduced requirements, such as batteries, pesticides, lamps (bulbs), and mercury-containing equipment.

Resources:

truck illustrationThe Department of Transportation is responsible for developing, issuing, and enforcing hazardous materials regulations. Hazardous material includes hazardous waste and substances, marine pollutants, or any material subject to Environmental Protection Agency’s Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest requirements.

Microsoft Office document icon DOT Security Plan

The Department of Transportation outlines specific actions to ensure facility operations (including shipping) are conducted in a safe and secure manner.

File Department of Transportation (and MOT)

The DOT is responsible for developing, issuing, and enforcing hazardous materials regulations. The SOP includes DOT requirements, materials of trade,shipping and transporter checklist, and CFR reference.

Microsoft Office document icon Preparing waste for shipment

Requirements, tasks, and preparations to ensure hazardous materials are safe and ready for transport.

icon head gearsPrograms are responsible for ensuring compliance with training requirements, and includes those mandated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Minnesota Department of Transportation, and MPCA's Hazardous Waste Rules. The MPCA offers training annually for household hazardous waste programs.

Microsoft Office document icon HHW training requirements

Overview of DOT, categorization, health and safety, and general training requirements. Includes an individual training checklist.

MPCA’s training opportunities for HHW staff

Program management decisions

Disaster response plan

Toolbox for local units of government recovering from a natural disaster

Microsoft Office document icon HHW collection following a disaster

Guidance whenever an emergency incident requires clean-up following a tornado, flood, or other disaster to minimize hazards to human health or to the environment. Includes a sample press release and flyer.

PDF icon Disaster response plan for HHW regional programs

Household hazardous waste programs play a key role in helping communities protect human health and the environment following a disaster. Covers roles and duties for HHW regional program managers.